Hunter Museum Of American Part, Part Two Of Two

Posted by ginger On Thursday, May 14, 2015

Finishing up the visit to the Hunter Museum of American Art in Chattanooga -- this is the more contemporary collection:

Doris Leeper, Modular Wall Relief in Eight Colors, 1972-74
Doris Leeper, Modular Wall Relief in Eight Colors, 1972-74

Hung Liu, Pullman. 2004.
Hung Liu, Pullman. 2004.

Karen LaMonte, Reclining Dress Impression with Drapery, Glass Casting. 2006.
Karen LaMonte, Reclining Dress Impression with Drapery, Glass Casting. 2006.

Lalla Essaydi, Les Femmes Du Maroc, La Grande Odalisque. 2008.
Lalla Essaydi, Les Femmes Du Maroc, La Grande Odalisque. 2008.

Lalla Essaydi, Les Femmes Du Maroc, La Grande Odalisque. 2008.

Bo Bartlett, The Babysitter. 1999.
Bo Bartlett, The Babysitter. 1999.

Next to the Bo Bartlett painting, there was a notebook for guests to write their thoughts. So they did.
What Did They Expect? Visitor Reactions to 'The Babysitter'

Robert Stackhouse, Listings and Sailings. 1982.

Robert Stackhouse, Listings and Sailings. 1982.

Robert Stackhouse, Listings and Sailings. 1982.

Radcliffe Bailey, In The Returnal. 2007.
Radcliffe Bailey, In The Returnal. 2007.


Hunter Museum of American Art, Part One of Two.

Posted by ginger On Monday, May 11, 2015

Chattanooga has done well. The Hunter Museum of American Art there is pretty wonderful. They've got an exhibit of Eudora Welty's photographs on exhibit and another TVA photography exhibit doing on, and has a nice permanent collection between very, very different buildings. I was really looking for them to include Southern visionary art of which I don't remember a single piece -- even the Tennessee Aquarium a short walk away has a display -- but even with that, it was great.

Here's part one of two -- in this one, the buildings and some of the older pieces (more modern next time):

The museum is on this bluff overlooking the Tennessee River:
Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga TN

This walkway took me directly to Av and the boys who were playing at the Aquarium.

Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga TN

"Free Money" by Tom Otterness, which is to depict everyday working people dancing atop a sackful of money:
Tom Otterness: Free Money at Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga TN

This is Deborah Butterfield's 'Boreal' (2001) which appears as driftwood but is actually cast bronze with a patina.
Deborah Butterfield: Boreal at Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga TN

Walking up to it, I really thought it was one of Heather Jansch's driftwood horses, like these we found at Alys Beach:
Driftwood Horses by Heather Jansch at Alys Beach 30A

Main entrance
Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga TN

Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga TN

Here, connected, is the Faxon-Hunter mansion, which was once home to the owner of the world's first Coca-Cola bottling company.
Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga TN

The main, modern entrance includes the exhibit on view now through July 12, 2015 -- Eudora Welty and the Segregated South.  Next, one walks into the Faxon-Hunter Mansion for the early part of the collection.

Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga TN

Drink in the moulding.
Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga TN

Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga TN

Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga TN

Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga TN

'Ruth Gleaning' by Randolph Rogers
Ruth Gleaning by Randolph Rogers, Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga TN

'The Huntsman's Door' circa 1890 by Richard LaBarre Goodwin. It was the first art purchased by the museum.
The Huntsman's Door by Richard LaBarre Goodwin, Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga TN

Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga TN

Mary Cassatt's circa 1890 'Baby Bill in His Cap and Shift, Held by His Nurse':
Baby Bill in his Cap and Shift, Held by His Nurse by Mary Cassatt

Grandma Moses' 1947 'Over the River to Grandma's House on Thanksgiving':
Over the River to Grandma's House on Thanksgiving by Grandma Moses

Thomas Hart Benton's 1943 'The Wreck of the Ole '97'.  Benton collected folk music and based this painting on the song inspired by this actual train incident.
The Wreck of the Ole '97 by Thomas Hart Benton

Marsden Hartley's 1938-39 'Chanties to the North':
Marsden Hartley: Chanties to the North

and to set us up for part two, Charles Joseph Biederman's 1977-78 #17, as viewed from an angle:
#17 by Charles Joseph Biederman

And That's How We Do It.

Posted by ginger On Thursday, May 07, 2015

Every time I visit The Cabildo, I see someone taking a picture of this sign.  Me too.

Sign at The Cabildo, New Orleans LA

Cochon, New Orleans

Posted by ginger On Wednesday, May 06, 2015

Av loves Cochon.  Here's why. It's cool. You're seated close to others so it's easy to make friends (and ideas of what to order next by what they're getting). All of Donald Link's restaurants rock. And Av's met him and thinks he's great.

Also: Cochon is walking distance from the museum district.  So 5* from me.

Cochon, New Orleans LA

Plus the most important part...it's crazy delicious.  Maybe so delicious that I couldn't take a pic in focus.

fried alligator with chili garlic mayonnaise:

Cochon, New Orleans LA

wood-fired oysters with chili garlic butter.
Cochon, New Orleans LA

boudin balls:
Cochon, New Orleans LA

Cochon, New Orleans LA

and boucherie plate:
Cochon, New Orleans LA

Yes, yes, yes.

Tim Tingle's Tree King

Posted by ginger On Monday, May 04, 2015

The first time we had ever seen Tim Tingle's carvings was at Orr Park in Montevallo, Alabama:
Tim Tingle's Carvings at Orr Park in Montevallo AL

Tim Tingle's Carvings at Orr Park in Montevallo AL

In March, we visited Aldridge Gardens in Hoover -- which is wonderful and charming and not-too-big and not-too-small...lovely walking trail with lake and art like below plus some Frank Fleming...
Aldridge Gardens, Hoover AL

The boys have been coming here since they were babies.  We had a regular schedule for each of the five weekdays: Birmingham Botanical Gardens, Birmingham Zoo, Birmingham Museum of Art, Aldridge Gardens, and one day for whatever.  Shug:
Aldridge Gardens, Hoover AL

...and here's Shugie by the Tim Tingle carving:
Shugie at Aldridge Gardens, Hoover AL with Tim Tingle Carving

Tim Tingle Art at Aldridge Gardens, Hoover AL

Tim Tingle Art at Aldridge Gardens, Hoover AL

Tim Tingle Art at Aldridge Gardens, Hoover AL

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Late last month, Ai Weiwei's Iron Tree opened to the public at Meijer Gardens in Michigan.  It's his largest outdoor sculpture yet, 22' tall x 22' wide, 'composed of 99 unique iron pieces cast from individual tree elements from southern China. Held together with oversize stainless steel bolts, Iron Tree appears as a living tree in form, but upon closer examination, the diversity of shapes, exaggeration of reality and awkwardness of the bolts create a much different image.'

We found this abandoned motel in Cherokee, North Carolina:

Abandoned Motel, Cherokee NC

Hi! Someone In My Family Is In Your Floor.

Posted by ginger On Monday, April 27, 2015

Besides a wish to see the inside of this gorgeous building, there was another reason to visit one of the most beautiful buildings on St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans, Christ Church Cathedral.

Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans LA

One of my family members (not super-close) is actually buried there. Inside. In the floor. Which...I'm Jewish so that's a little bit of a novelty (not all of my family is Jewish).  It's Bishop Leonidas Polk who was a founder of Sewanee and CSA general who was killed during the '64 Atlanta Campaign. He was known as the 'fighting bishop' during the war as he was Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Louisiana, and that's why he's buried here.  This is the first non-Roman Catholic church in the Louisiana territory.

And it's gorgeous.
Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans LA

The congregation was founded in 1803.  Their first was riverside of Canal and Bourbon. It soon became too small, so a second building was consecrated in 1837. It was eventually purchased by Judah Touro and became Nefutzoth Yehudah synagogue after extensive renovation (it's interesting -- see pg 19).  Through partnership with another congregation, that's now known as Touro Synagogue, which is also now on St. Charles, consecrated in 1909.  Touro is *so* pretty too -- we've been to services there.

This is Christ Church's fourth building.
Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans LA

Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans LA

Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans LA

Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans LA

These needlepoint cushions were terrific:
Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans LA

...and there's cousin Leo:
Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans LA

Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans LA

And as to how I got in, I just explained that cousin Leo was...here...and they completely understood.  Usually I'm comfortable asking for whatever, but I played how I was going to make this request about a dozen times in my head.  I didn't actually say "someone in my family is in your floor" like in the title here (!!)...but just explained who I was and if it would be okay to visit.  In fact, the sweet woman in the office said that they get visitors who come to see him pretty often.  His place is up on the -- well in Jewish parlance we call it the bimah, but in this case I think it is called the altar.  The raised area in the front of the sanctuary.  Right by the organist.

Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans LA
So we have family buried inside Christ Church Cathedral, and at Chevra Thilim down Canal.  Probably the only people who can say that.

Anyway, the stained glass here is -- amazing:
Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans LA

Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans LA

Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans LA

So, so, so nice.
Christ Church Cathedral, New Orleans LA

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BTW, (from The Atlantic:) Charlemagne is everybody's PawPaw.