Buddha

Posted by ginger On Wednesday, March 18, 2015

This, at Jungle Gardens on Avery Island, Louisiana. Magic.
Jungle Gardens, Avery Island LA

The gardens were developed by Edward Avery 'Ned' McIlhenny, the son of the inventor of Tabasco sauce.  The Tabasco factory (and store) are here in the area, but you'd never know it once you've entered the gardens:

Jungle Gardens, Avery Island LA

This building was constructed to house a buddha that is ~1000 years old.  Legend has it that it had been shipped to a NYC warehouse in the 1920s by a Chinese warlord, and had sat unclaimed until 1936 when two of Ned's friends bought it and sent it to him as a surprise.

Jungle Gardens, Avery Island LA

Jungle Gardens, Avery Island LA

Jungle Gardens, Avery Island LA

Jungle Gardens, Avery Island LA

Ghost, In Bullet Casings

Posted by ginger On Monday, March 16, 2015

Av and I had just been talking about Charles Hoffacker's art when he happened to visit Treo in New Orleans on Tulane Avenue with some friends.  He knew I'd be happy when he sent me these pics of Hoffacker's 'Ghost of Telly Hankton' (if you're interested in seeing it, call and make sure it's still on display).

Charles Hoffacker Art: Ghost of Telly Hankton

The work was completed in 2012, is 42" x 56.5", made up of .40 cal spent rounds on a plywood base, finished with oxidation chemicals and polish.  It was being offered at $14k.

Charles Hoffacker Art: Ghost of Telly Hankton

The artist was in the news last summer as part of an investigation into a complaint that was made, alleging that he used a murder victim's blood to write a message at the crime scene.  His lawyer noted that the case was blown out of proportion, that the crime scene wasn't compromised and the victim had long been moved from the scene.

---
Next month Treo is having a month-long 'ArtPolice' show, with opening reception:
Come for the opening reception of this New Orleans Police Officer exhibition…there will be complimentary libations.

The exhibition is curated by Charlie Hoffacker and highlights his work and other police officers with artistic talent.

Join him and fellow officers , Liz Garcia, M NOLA Rolla Watson and James ” Pepe” Martin and help raise money for the 1st district.

BPOML

Posted by ginger On Wednesday, March 11, 2015

BPOML.
Best pizza of my life.
NOLA, It's one of Emeril's restaurants (though from what I understand he's there only a few times a year.  As in a very few.) there on St. Louis in the Quarter.

NOLA, New Orleans

I first had supper there probably fifteen years ago, and besides loving the super-attentive service, my friends and I weren't especially impressed with the food.  So all this time, I just haven't gone out of my way to go back to it...however, I noticed they are open for lunch on Thursdays.  The thinking was that even if it isn't great, I'll be paying lunch prices and it won't be as heartbreaking as a disappointing supper.  Lunch here was a great decision -- and there was zero disappointment.

NOLA, New Orleans

NOLA, New Orleans

I sat at the bar, snacked on some bread, and had a great conversation with the chef that was running the brick oven. Since I liked him so much, I decided to choose something we could chat about while it was cooked right in front of my practically -- so I set on the duck confit pizza with fried egg, truffle oil, parmesan, and arugula.

NOLA, New Orleans

NOLA, New Orleans

The crust was amazing. The duck was...well, it was duck confit so you know that's amazing...and then there's that yummy runny yolk from the egg mixed with the oil and the cheese and the fresh bite of the arugula. Perfection. BPOML. Yes.  Yes.

Lafayette No. 1

Posted by ginger On Monday, March 09, 2015

Images from our last visit to Lafayette No. 1 cemetery (est. 1833), in New Orleans:

Lafayette No. 1

Lafayette No. 1

Lafayette No. 1

Lafayette No. 1

Lafayette No. 1

Lafayette No. 1

Lafayette No. 1

Pink Parker Never Would Get Over It.

Posted by ginger On Wednesday, March 04, 2015

Born in 1839 in southeast Alabama, Joseph Pinkney Parker grew up to have an obsession.  By most accounts, he was a well-respected man in Troy, Alabama -- he'd been a corporal in the CSA (was at Appomattox for the surrender), teacher, police officer.  But when John Wilkes Booth assassinated Lincoln, that hit a nerve which even cost 'Pink' his place in his Baptist church and eventually garnered him much resentment from around the country.  Pink had blamed the failing, and failings, of his homeland to Lincoln and considered Booth a hero.  For years after the event, Pink would wear a badge on the anniversary of the death that would have the anniversary year and the words, 'anniversary death of Old Abe Lincoln'.  His pastor asked him to stop going on about it and eventually he was even removed from the membership.

In 1906, Pink couldn't stop talking about it, and commissioned a ~3' tall monument to honor Booth, which he asked to have placed in the Troy town square.  It read:

'Erected by
PINK PARKER
in honor of JOHN WILKS
BOOTH,
for killing old
ABE LINCOLN.

It was never placed there as the town wouldn't approve it.  The monument found a home in Pink's front yard on Madison Street, as it was private property.

In 1921, things blew up in the press, letters were written, and the monument finally found its place behind a shed.  Pink was by that time in poor health and had been living with a son in Georgia since 1918.

Brooklyn Eagle, June 5, 1921:

Mrs. C. D. Brooks, president of the Woman's League of
Republican Voters in Alabama, has issued a call to good citizens,
whatever their party affiliations, to join with the League in
plans to remove the monument to John Wilkes Booth, the as-
sassin of Abraham Lincoln, which is still standing in Troy,
Alabama, where there is also a State Normal School. This was
erected by popular subscription in 1866. The sentiment that
condoned the political murder of the most lovable man in his-
tory is a curious thing to study after the lapse of more than
half a century. The whole South of today honors Lincoln's
memory. There are no pilgrims to the grave of John Wilkes
Booth or to his monument.


The editor of the Troy paper wrote to the Brooklyn Eagle:
Editor Brooklyn Daily Eagle:

An article appearing in your paper of recent date, and
which was reproduced in many papers of this section, headed
"An Assassin's Monument," has come to the notice of the
writer. We regret very much that this article appeared in your
paper because of the fact that the true facts in the case were
not given. However, this is not the first time our city has been
given undue publicity regarding this monument. Several years
ago the St. Louis Post-Dispatch gave a full page writeup of it.

I will state the facts in the case for your information and
trust you will see fit to clear up the matter as the people of
our city do not appreciate the publicity we are getting out of
this thing.

The monument, a very small one, something similar to a
small head-stone we have all seen in small cemeteries, bears
the inscription "erected by Pink Parker in memory of John
Wilkes Booth for the killing of old Abe Lincoln." The little
stone was set up in the front yard of this old man, and we want
it thoroughly understood that it was erected by Mr. Parker
himself and paid for with his own money. He says himself
that not one penny was contributed or solicited.

Some few months ago, this old man almost lost his eye-
sight and moved to another State to make his home with his
son. Upon leaving, he disposed of his property here. Before
he sold his property, however, a wind storm visited our city
and blew the stone down. The new owner of the property has
never re-erected the stone and will not. And now the stone lies
flat with the inscription buried in the ground and is not notice-
able from the street.

The people of this town did not approve of the erection of
such a monument when it was set up some 15 years ago. It
was seen by very few people, as the old man's home was not
on a principal street, and the people of this city now really are
glad that the monument no longer stands.

We are making the facts known to you simply because we
do not care for the publicity we are getting about this matter
and now that we have stated the facts to you we believe you
will be fair enough to the people of this section to so state the
facts in your excellent paper.

We have reproduced your article in our paper with our
comment and also given notice that in case we could have the
facts published in your paper we would also reproduce it in our
paper.

If you care to do your Southern friends this favor, kindly
mail a copy of your paper to this office that we may pass on
to our readers the correction of a mistake that does a gross in-
justice to the citizenship of our little city.

B. G. McCalman

Editor Troy, Ala., Herald.


When Pink Parker passed away, his sons had the John Wilkes Booth monument re-engraved, erasing the original inscription, and it served as Pink's cemetery monument.

Last year, I found it in Oakwood Cemetery there in Troy:

Joseph Pinkney Parker Monument, Oakwood Cemetery, Troy AL

Joseph Pinkney Parker Monument, Oakwood Cemetery, Troy AL

Joseph Pinkney
Parker
Born 
Aug. 16, 1839
Died 
Dec. 12, 1921
Joseph Pinkney Parker Monument, Oakwood Cemetery, Troy AL

On the reverse:
Served through the 
War of 1861-65
In Company A
2nd Ga. Bat Inf
Wright's Brigade
Mahone's Div.
A.P. Hill's Corps
Army Northern Va.
Joseph Pinkney Parker Monument, Oakwood Cemetery, Troy AL

In the March '15 Smithsonian Magazine:
The Closest Source we have to Really Knowing John Wilkes Booth is his Sister

There were six degrees between Booth and Kevin Bacon.

John Wilkes Booth killed Lincoln...but who killed John Wilkes Booth?

The Historic New Orleans Collection

Posted by ginger On Thursday, February 26, 2015

At first, The Historic New Orleans Collection doesn't quite sound like a museum.  I remember first thinking: jewelry? A gift shop?  But it is actually one of the best museums in the Quarter.  And it's not just a museum -- it's  research center and publisher as well.  It's one of the places I visit every summer without fail when we live in the Quarter for a couple of weeks.  It's interesting, it's lovely, and it's...air conditioned.

Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

This is the Counting House, a 1794 warehouse which was renovated in the 1830s, which features paintings by Louisiana artists:
Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

Several other galleries of the museum make up the 'Louisiana History Galleries'.  This is an oil painting by Jose Francisco Xavier de Salazar y Mendoza.  He arrived in Louisiana in 1782 from Merida, Mexico, and did this painting ca 1795 of Clara de la Motte (ca 1761-1822) who was a Jewish emigre from Curacao.  She had only arrived here in 1787 and married Benjamin Monsanto, who was also Jewish.  But...they married in a Catholic ceremony at the Church of St. Louis. After a fire, a rebuilding, and adding on, that today is St. Louis Cathedral.
Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

This is a collage with watercolor, ca. 1842 by William Henry Brown, and what makes it so special is...
Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA'

...that it was done as silhouette.  All these pieces are actually separately cut out and applied:
Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA


Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

This oil is from 1860, by John Antrobus, and is titled 'A Plantation Burial':
Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

Here, the slaves and preacher in mourning:
Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA


The owner and his wife look on:
Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

and the artist has painted himself in, as well:
Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

Portrait of Judah P. Benjamin,
Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA


Ad for '60 Very Choice Sugar Plantation Hands':
Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

In holdings of more recent vintage, this 1991 bumper sticker for Edwin Edwards (funny thing: Av had a phone conversation with him late last year, said he sounded like a likable, regular guy):
Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

...an anti-Huey Long medal (made to appear as a toilet seat with him being hit in the jaw), to commemorate an embarrassing incident in which he got into a fight in a men's room in Long Island:
Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

Here, a placard and cue card for the Mahalia Jackson Show:
Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

...and you know *exactly* what this is:
Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

The museum's next exhibition begins in March: 'New Orleans and the Domestic Slave Trade, 1808-1865'.
Historic New Orleans Collection, New Orleans LA

Mr B's Bistro

Posted by ginger On Tuesday, February 24, 2015

Lunch at Mr. B's Bistro (another Brennan's restaurant...this one is run by Cindy Brennan) in the Quarter...

Mr. B's Bistro, New Orleans

The most well-received dish here is the barbecue shrimp, but I was really only hungry enough for an appetizer -- in this case, the duck springrolls ('two house-made springrolls filled with duck confit, shiitake mushrooms, spinach and goat cheese; served with sweet ginger-garlic dipping sauce') which weren't quite as good as I wanted to be.  The description sounded amazing but altogether it tasted of nothing in particular.  Well, the Bloody Mary kept things going, at least.  And I couldn't help myself from having some bread, especially after it was presented in that super-cute bag...

Mr. B's Bistro, New Orleans

Mack's Nut Shop, Grady AL

Posted by ginger On Monday, February 23, 2015