Lunch At Miss Mary Bobo's

Posted by ginger On Thursday, September 11, 2014

Miss Mary Bobo's, Lynchburg, Tennessee
We were able to get in for lunch at Miss Mary Bobo's in Lynchburg, Tennessee earlier this year.  It seems that reservations are requested days or weeks in advance, as the setup is family-style dining, with each table having its own host.  We called about a week before our visit, left a message preferring the earlier of the day's two seatings, and they confirmed our reservation.  Lunch is $20.

Miss Mary Bobo's, Lynchburg TN

We've been wanting to come here for so long.  We love revolving table restaurants (like Walnut Hills in Vicksburg and Dinner Bell) and family-style (like Monell's in Nashville and Mrs. Wilkes' in Savannah) because it's so much fun to sit down with strangers and once the meal is over, we're friends.  Miss Mary Bobo's is unique in that each table sits with a host, whose job it is to get things rolling with introductions and stories, etc.

Miss Mary Bobo's, Lynchburg TN
(Lynchburg's most famous past resident, who supped here many times)
Miss Mary Bobo ran this establishment as a boarding house from 1908 until her passing in 1983.  She lived to be 102.  

You can mill around the home beforehand or afterwards to view the furnishings, and of course there's a giftshop.
Miss Mary Bobo's, Lynchburg TN

We were in one of these outer rooms in the back.
Miss Mary Bobo's, Lynchburg TN

I wish I had taken more pictures inside.  We were seated with probably a dozen people at the table, and the food was waiting on us.  The food was passed, but after the initial introductions began by our host, there wasn't very much talking going on.  Here I was, thinking I was going to see what a great conversationalist could do with a nice group of people, but there wasn't much chatter at all.  I decided to get things going and so I asked her a few questions that maybe we would all enjoy ("what's the funniest thing you've seen as a host here?" etc.).  We decided that if the host wasn't going to get everyone talking, we were.  We all had a good time, but it was a little mystifying.

Here's the other thing: the food wasn't very good in general.  It wasn't bad, it's just that none of it was delicious.  It was utilitarian food.  The mashed potatoes were mashed potatoes and the beans were beans, even the fried chicken was just fried chicken.  From my plate, I tried to get a bite or two of most things served.  There wasn't anything I wanted more of.  A shame, because I really just wanted to love this place.
Miss Mary Bobo's, Lynchburg TN
So the best part of the meal food-wise was the dessert, pecan pie with Jack Daniel's.
Miss Mary Bobo's, Lynchburg TN

From al.com:
Mary and Jack Bobo opened the Bobo Hotel in September, 1908, in a white Federal-style house on Lynchburg's Main Street. Miss Mary quickly built a successful business that was popular with single school teachers, traveling salesmen and federal revenuers stopping by to check on the local distillery.

The tax man didn't have to go far - Mr. Jack Daniel himself often took his noonday meal at the boarding house.

"Dinner at Miss Mary Bobo's may have been the early 20th century version of a power lunch," Lynne Tolley, current proprietress of Miss Mary Bobo's and great-grandniece of Jack Daniel said. "Jack Daniel and Lem Motlow were both frequent guests, and the local bank president, Tom Motlow, lived here."

Grave Shelters At Istre Cemetery, Acadia Parish LA

Posted by ginger On Wednesday, September 10, 2014

We originally went out to the Istre Cemetery in Acadia Parish to see the grave shelters (I've documented graveshelters elsewhere here here here here here here here here here and here for a few).  The whole cemetery had interesting monuments:

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA

Istre Cemetery, Acadiana Parish LA



Psychic Studio, Montgomery AL

Posted by ginger On Tuesday, September 09, 2014

Freedom Rides Museum, Montgomery AL

Posted by ginger On Monday, September 08, 2014

Freedom Rides Museum, Montgomery AL

In February at our last visit to the Freedom Rides Museum at the old Greyhound Bus Station in Montgomery, Charlie Lucas had his piece 'We Ride Together' on exhibit:
Freedom Rides Museum, Montgomery AL

Freedom Rides Museum, Montgomery AL

'Transforming Hate: Freedom Riders, 1961' by Jean Grosser, here include images of riders Doris Castle, Peter Ackerberg, and Dion Diamond:

Freedom Rides Museum, Montgomery AL

'Let Freedom Ride II' by Yvonne Wells:
Freedom Rides Museum, Montgomery AL

Portrait of Chela Lightchild by Eric Ethridge, accompanied by her arrest photo when she was 20 and went by Marcia Rosenbaum:
Freedom Rides Museum, Montgomery AL

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Last year, we saw this mural of 'The Other Bus' -- the Trailways bus.  The sign here to the left of the bus explains that there were two buses of integrated groups of people that left Atlanta on May 14, 1961 bound for Birmingham.  The Greyhound bus is known as the 'burning bus' as it burned six miles SW of Anniston.  The Trailways bus passengers had a harrowing experience as well (story here, from NPR).  

Trailways Freedom Riders Mural, Annison AL

A group in Anniston is raising money for developing a 'Freedom Riders' Park'.

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In 2011, I took these pictures at the Mississippi Museum of Art of Freedom Riders:
Freedom Riders, Mississippi Museum of Art, Jackson MS

Freedom Riders, Mississippi Museum of Art, Jackson MS

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Joe Minter's Freedom Riders piece (if I remember correctly, he made this one in 2011 and was exhibited at the museum in Montgomery):
Joe Minter

Shabbat Candles

Posted by ginger On Friday, September 05, 2014

I try to light candles each Friday evening for Shabbat.

Have to admit...I have a little bit of a fear about keeping an open candle flame going when we have two small children about.  I've even been known to move candlesticks to the sink just to keep the flame away from anything.  Not that my kids are monkeys, but you know how easy it is (and how paranoid parents can be).  When other people talk about how great gas stovetops are, I'm thinking how thankful I am to avoid that kind of thing altogether because we have electric.  It's really me.  But still.

Earlier this summer, I found this great hurricane candle holder, and the minute I saw it, I thought: perfect for Shabbat candles.  Glass all around, we can see the beautiful light, you can see it outside the window, and...whew...safe.

Then I thought: the pretty and functional way to make the candles stay upright is with sand.

And then I wondered if I could make the sand symbolic in some way.  This may be too granola-crunchy for some of you, but could I make the medium, sand, stand for something?  Could I make each grain of sand representative of our community?  I looked up how many Jewish people there are in the world (13.9MM), did a calculation as to how many grains of sand fit in a cup measure (well, that depends on several variables, not least of which are the exact dimension of the grain of sand and how much room there is between grains).

BTW, a group of scientists at the University of Hawaii figure that on our earth, there are approximately 7.5 x 10 to the 18th power grains of sand.  That's seven quintillion, five hundred quadrillion grains.

I just needed 13.9 million of them in a hurricane, via cup measure.

After a dozen different Google searches, I decided on one equation, figured even if it was off by a ton that the Almighty would understand and get where I was coming from, and so I measured as carefully as I could some sand we had brought back from the beach, and:

Shabbat Candles
Sometimes I use the short candles that come with the glass cups, as above.

Other times, the tall ones:
Shabbat Candles

Shabbat Candles

Shabbat Candles

Abandoned Perfection

Posted by ginger On Thursday, September 04, 2014

We were walking in Pulaski, stopped to look at something, made a new friend, and was asked if we wanted to see something special.

Naturally this could be really wonderful or really awkward.

It was really wonderful.

There's a theater in Pulaski...
Pulaski Tennessee Theater

Theater, Pulaski TN

Theater, Pulaski TN

Theater, Pulaski TN

Theater, Pulaski TN

Theater, Pulaski TN

Theater, Pulaski TN

Theater, Pulaski TN

Theater, Pulaski TN

Theater, Pulaski TN

Theater, Pulaski TN

Theater, Pulaski TN

Theater, Pulaski TN

(Interested in the renovation, helping? Contact Tammy with the Southern Tennessee Area Arts Repertory.)