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Oakwood Cemetery, Montgomery AL

Wednesday, October 24, 2007

I got so many great emails about the post on Live Oak Cemetery in Selma -- lots and lots of interesting emails about those wonderful monuments and other places to see statuary like that (thank you!). Here are some pics from Oakwood Cemetery in Montgomery.

Just as we were driving in, we saw these ceramic chickens on a couple of monuments:Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

This section below with all the flowers has a monument that reads:

"Buried here are 78 officers and men of the Royal Air Force who lost their lives whilst training in Montgomery, Alabama during the Second World War. Nearly 1,000 men who died during that war or the First World War when serving with the forces of Britain or the other Commonwealth countries lie buried in cemeteries throughout the United States of America. Their graves and this cross of sacrifice which commemorates them are maintained by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission".
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This monument is made of metal - it's for someone who died of yellow fever in 1873:
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Sad:
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The Confederate section:
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Monument for Hiram Haines:
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Governor William Calvin Oates:
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His monument reads:
"Born in poverty, reared in adversity, without educational advantages, yet by honest individual effort he obtained a competency and the confidence of his fellow men. While fairly liberal to relatives and the worthy poor, a devoted Confederate soldier, he gave his right arm for The Cause. He accepted the result of the war without a murmur and in 1896-98 he was a Brigadier General of United States Volunteers in the war with Spain."

He was born in Pike county and practiced law in Abbeville. He was Captain in the 15th Alabama Infantry, then Colonel in the 48th. When it says that he "gave his right arm" - um, he actually did(!). It was shattered by a minie ball Petersburg in August 1864. He went on to become a legislator, congressman, and governor of the state from 1894-96.

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